Katy Bonaro’s Art Shines

Katy Bonaro's Art Shines

Murugi Thande, Photography Editor

Photorealist Katy Bonaro (‘12) impresses many North Point students and staff with artwork that comes to life. Her art exudes her organized, detailed, and focused personality.

Bonaro’s inquisitiveness first peaked in 2nd and 3rd grade, when she stumbled into Draw 50, a series of step by step drawing books, at the library. Utilizing a combination of these books and her own, she developed. It was not until seventh and eight grades that art became a serious aspect of her life. She buckled down to hone her artistic ability, and availed herself of upper level art classes. Ever since, her work has been recognized by Congressman Steny Hoyer, displayed in the Library of Congress and received countless accolades in art shows.  Mr. Ball, AP art teacher said, “She is one of the best students I have ever had in my eighteen years of teaching.”

Methodical, she arrives to class, gets straight to work, and executes her plan to completion. Her creative process begins when she picks a photo that holds significance. Next, she draws grid lines and sketches. Lastly, she utilizes acrylic paint or colored pencils to finish it off. To ensure it looks realistic, she inspects every detail, heeding advice from people like Mr. Ball and her mother. “The time she puts into her artwork is the same as she has done as a runner; she is very disciplined. She puts effort into it, and that is why she is the way she is,” Ball said.

Photorealist Richard Estes, Audrey Flack, and Janet Fish all influence Bonaro’s work. However, her greatest influence is drawn from her mother, a former artist. Artworks from her mother’s youth motivate Bonaro to keep going. Whenever she needs help, her mother offers advice and critique. “I know I get a lot of my artistic ability from her, and I know I don’t want to let it go,” she expressed.

In future, she hopes continue with art, doing side jobs on occasion. For now, as Bonaro prepares her to send her AP Art portfolio to College Board in the spring, she hopes for a score of three or higher.