#OscarSoWhite

#OscarSoWhite

Amani Jackson, Staff Writer

On January 14, the #OscarSoWhite was trending on Twitter after the nominations for the 88th Annual Academy awards were announced. It’s almost like deja vu. For another consecutive year, no minorities were nominated in any of the acting categories. Jessica Goldstein on twitter wrote, “Maybe they’re doing #OscarSoWhite again because Hollywood loves sequels.”

2015 was a year for diversity in movies. Movies like, “Creed,” “Straight Outta Of Compton,” “Concussion,” “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” and “Beast of No Nation” made a huge profit. The leading actors in those movies are colored actors like Will Smith, Edris Alba, Micheal B. Jordan, John Boyega, and the whole cast of “Straight Outta of Compton.” Fans took to Twitter to express their confusion about the Academy overlooking those amazing movies.

IMG_5728“It’s actually worse than last year. Best Documentary and Best Original Screenplay. That’s it. #OscarsSoWhite,” said April Reign, an editor who is credited for launching #OscarSoWhite.”

Hollywood in the last couple of years has grown in diversity, but that remained mainly in television. There are one or two movies that contain diversity each year that become nominated for prestigious awards, but that basically is it. In 2014, “Selma” was sure to be nominated for best actor and actress, but was cut short and only nominated for best picture and best original song. Why? Was it not up to Hollywood’s standards? Many people counterattacked the controversy stating that this years and last year’s diverse actors and actresses did not do as well as the years before. But many people beg to differ.

Even though diverse movies tend to be turned away from acknowledgments there have been movies in Hollywood with diversity that have won and/or were nominated for those prestigious award shows. “12 Years A Slave,” “Crash,” “Hotel Rwanda,” “The Color Purple,” “The Joy Luck Club,” “Boyz In The Hood,” and “Training Day,” are just a few diverse movies that were recognized not because of race, but because of outstanding performances.

Some celebrities even went as far as to boycott the Oscars. Jada Pinkett-Smith, actress and wife of Will Smith, expressed via Facebook that she will neither attend nor watch the show and that she will be doing her own thing. She noted that, “The Academy has the right to acknowledge whoever they choose. To invite whoever they choose. And I think that it’s our responsibility now to make the change.” Her husband, Will Smith, was not nominated for his role in “Concussion,” although he was for best actor at the Golden Globes. Also, director of “Do The Right Thing,” Spike Lee has joined Pinket-Smith and took to Instagram to express his regards, “But, How Is It Possible For The 2nd Consecutive Year All 20 Contenders Under The Actor Category Are White?”

The lack of diversity in Hollywood, should not be diminishing since Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science, is indeed African American and would understand the struggle of diversity in Hollywood. After all the controversy days after the nominees where announced, Oscars-Cheryl-Boone-Isaacs[1]she released a statement with US Weekly, “While we celebrate their extraordinary achievements, I am both heartbroken and frustrated about the lack of inclusion. This is a difficult but important conversation, and it’s time for big changes. The Academy is taking dramatic steps to alter the makeup of our membership. In the coming days and weeks we will conduct a review of our membership recruitment in order to bring about much-needed diversity in our 2016 class and beyond,” stated Issac.

Ironically the host of this year’s Oscars is black, comedian and actor, Chris Rock. Rock is a vocal critic for racial profiling and is an advocate for Black Lives Matter. His second year hosting, Chris joked that this year’s ceremony is the “white BET Awards.” With that joke there a many more to come and almost everyone is excited to hear what he will say in his opening Monologue about the lacking diversity in the crowd.