Student Centered: Vice Principal Mr. Genua

Asher Dewey, Staff Writer

Some students don’t know what they are going to become when they grow up, even some seniors struggle with figuring out what they want to do. For North Point’s new Vice Principal Mr. Genua, that wasn’t the case. “ I always knew I wanted to work in the educational system,” he said. “I was inspired by a former teacher.”

Mr. Genua leans back in his chair as he recalls the days of being a student. “[High school] was a very good experience for me. My favorite subjects were math and P.E.” Mr. Genua has a passion for sports and physical education.  “I love sports. I played football and baseball all four years of high school, and Mr. Lane was my coach. He’s the head coach at North Point now. ”

When asked about his life after high school, Mr. Genua points to the wall beside his desk with a pen, where his two hard-earned diplomas hang.  He went to Towson University to get his bachelors degree. He then transferred to McDaniel College where he earned his Master’s in Science.

Before he became a North Point Administrator, he was an Assistant Administrator at Lackey High school. He has a lot of history with Lackey, he taught P.E. there for seven years, and before that, he taught at J.C. Parks Elementary School as a P.E. teacher as well, however, he “likes teaching high school level better.”

Sitting at his desk, Mr. Genua smiled as he talked.  When it comes to comparing teaching to administrating, Mr. Genua says: “While I was teaching, I always had someone to tell a problem to. Now, as an administrator, it’s my job to solve the problem.” Mr. Genua enjoys his vice principal, saying the best and funniest things about it are “daily interaction with students and seeing all the different personalities in every one of them.” However, the worst thing about it he says is “looking at boring data and numbers.”

Mr. Genua likes North Point so far. In his opinion, “the staff is great, open and friendly. The kids here are very well behaved and on task.” He will walk the halls and the walkway to the mods, monitoring the students to make sure they make it on time to class. With every “good morning” said to the students with a slight head nod, Mr. Genua strives to “make a difference in kid’s lives. My teaching philosophy is making sure things are student centered, and student driven. Working with the students to help them with their education, and getting the best grade possible.”